Louisville Library Begins Chapter with Tubelite Systems

Tubelite_KY_SWregLibrary_LSwimmer_web1Louisville’s new Southwest Regional Library recently opened its doors, which were provided by Tubelite Inc. along with its curtainwall and storefront framing. This new 40,000-square-foot, $10.2 million library boasts more than 120,000 books and materials, 100 public computers and the largest children’s library in the system. With respect to long-term environmental and economic sustainability, the project is pursuing LEED® Gold certification.

Southwest Regional Library is part of a master plan developed in 2008 by Minneapolis-based Meyer Scherer & Rockcastle (MSR). It is the first of three new buildings planned by the Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) system. “The master plan really set the vision for the service to the entire community. It included how to deal with their existing facilities, but also to be able to expand the service into areas and communities that are under reached,” explained MSR’s principal and architect, Matthew Kruntorad, AIA, LEED AP.

JRA Architects of Louisville collaborated with LFPL and MSR on Southwest Regional Library’s design. Sullivan Cozart served as the project’s construction manager and glazing contractor Koch Corporation specified and installed Tubelite’s entrance, curtainwall and window wall systems.
Tubelite_KY_SWregLibrary_LSwimmer_web2
Kruntorad elaborated, “It’s essentially a one-story open floor plan. Tubelite’s systems supported one of our overriding goals, which was to bring the children’s area up front, expressing the activity within the library and making it directly visible as one approached the building.”

The exterior was inspired by the act of discovery, with symbolic metal curtains that are peeled away to reveal greater knowledge within. Kruntorad continued, “The main entrance features two pairs of 9-foot-tall, wide stile doors from Tubelite – two pairs swing in and two swing out. Tubelite’s curtainwall also provided a key element for the library’s design’s daylight and transparency.”

Tubelite’s structurally glazed curtainwall allowed the project “to eliminate the exterior metal mullion covers, create an extremely clean exterior appearance and make the curtainwalls appear as open as possible,” added JRA’s project architect, Colin Drake, AIA, LEED AP. “Overall, the façade is like a village of buildings, set side by side. The building takes on a much more personal scale than the overwhelming monolithic façades common with the surrounding suburban context.”

Multiple concepts were reviewed during the project’s design planning phase. Drake remembered, “Originally, we had a much more monolithic building to try and compete with the scale of much larger nearby buildings. Then, we decided to break up the façade, pushing and pulling the pieces in plan and elevation to express the interior planning more clearly on the exterior, as well as creating opportunities for visitors to discover nuances about the building as they approached. The central curtainwall, which was dubbed the ‘beacon bay,’ stands above the rest of the building to draw sunlight deep into the building during the day and use the interior lighting to glow outward in the evening.”

The beacon bay features glazing frosted on the exterior and interior in offset, vertical stripes. From a distance, it appears to be a solid frost, but up close is revealed to allow clear views through the glass at certain angles. “In a truly progressive modern library, lighting is everything,” said Drake. By incorporating clerestories on the beacon bay, as well as in other strategic spots, the abundance of natural light in the space allows artificial lighting to be reduced in real time to minimize energy consumption.

Further supporting energy-efficiency criteria, both the curtainwall and window wall incorporate low-e insulating glass to reduce solar heat gain in the summer and heat loss in winter, thus ensuring year-round comfort for Louisville library users. “The storefront framing design allows for economical, on-site fabrication. It also virtually eliminates the transference of frost and condensation with industry-standard thermal breaks, providing framing members to incorporate the library’s entrance doors,” said Jim Oberlin, Tubelite’s Eastern regional sales manager.

Complementing the doors and window wall, Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall proved ideal for the scale and metallic aesthetic of the new library. To ensure a precise installation, Koch’s glazing team conducted field measurements prior to Tubelite manufacturing it. An eight-person crew handled the on-site installation, which was completed in October 2014. Koch’s project manager, Edwin Penna, noted, “We have a long-term relationship with Tubelite. We know how to work well together to meet the unique requirements of each project.”
Tubelite_KY_SWregLibrary_LSwimmer_web3
Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall features 2.5-inch sightlines and an overall 6-inch system depth. Its durable framework provides exceptional structural performance, reducing the need for steel reinforcing. The aluminum used to produce Tubelite systems was extruded using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly finishes.

Enhancing the project’s environmental attributes, longevity and metallic appearance, the recycled aluminum framing was finished by Linetec using clear anodize on the interior and bronze anodize on the exterior. Because anodize is an integral part of the substrate, the coating delivers excellent wear and abrasion resistance with minimal maintenance. Anodize process by-products are recyclable and anodized aluminum is 100 percent recyclable.

Recognizing Southwest Regional Library’s exceptional design with metal, the project was named the overall winner in the 2014 Metal Construction News Building and Roofing Awards.

**

Southwest Regional Library, 9725 Dixie Highway, Louisville, KY 40272, http://www.lfpl.org/branches/southwest.htm
* Owner: Louisville Free Public Library; Louisville, Kentucky; http://www.lfpl.org
* Architect: Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle, Ltd.; Minneapolis; http://msrdesign.com
* Architect: JRA Architects; Louisville, Kentucky; http://jrarchitects.com
* Construction manager: Sullivan Cozart; Louisville, Kentucky; http://www.sullivancozart.com
* Glazing contractor: Koch Corporation; Louisville, Kentucky; http://kochcorporation.com
* Curtainwall, window wall and entrance systems – manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
* Curtainwall, window wall and entrance systems – finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://linetec.com
* Photographer: Lara Swimmer Photography

###

Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

...[View full article]

Mansfield Center for Performing Arts Uses Tubelite’s Products

Tubelite_TX_MansfieldISD-PerfArtsCtr1_Huckabee_webAt 141,000 square feet and situated on a Texas hill, Mansfield Independent School District’s Center for the Performing Arts commands an audience amongst the students, staff and the community. Its oversized entrances are matched with large, curving spans of glass and aluminum storefront and curtainwall with sun shades – all provided by Tubelite Inc. Towering concrete columns accent the façade for a sense of flow and cascading mass.

Designed by Huckabee, the high school’s new performing arts center opened for its first event in 2012. The 5,500-seat Cunningham Performance Hall sits at its heart. Its multi-use design enables the hall to be divided into three separate event venues – including two 750-person lecture halls. In addition, a professional development center accommodates up to 500 and can be divided into six separate break-out rooms designed for meeting, training and banquet needs. Adjacent to the space are three state-of-the-art computer laboratories.

Photos courtesy of HuckabeeByrne Construction Services managed the nearly two year-long building project estimated at more than $40 million. Texas Commercial Glass Concepts brought the signature look from creation to completion with Tubelite’s products. In total, 3,400 lineal feet of Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall and 14000 Series storefront wrap the performing arts center. A forecourt plaza collects visitors as they approach the facility, and a short set of stairs emphasizes the procession up the covered walkway, leading to the 9-foot-high wide stile doors at the central lobby tower.

“They wanted an impressive building with big stretches of radius curtainwall, lots of glass and monumental doors.” Tubelite was able to step in, meeting the spec and schedule, without missing a beat,” said Patric Murphy, vice president/operations manager at Texas Commercial Glass Concepts. “It was one of our larger jobs and it turned out very well. It definitely is impressive.”

Photos courtesy of HuckabeeBeyond aesthetics, Tubelite’s thermally improved, 7-inch-deep curtainwall and Max/Block™ sun shades help keep out the Texas heat. The sun shades’ 5-inch airfoil blades and tubular fascia direct wind and water away from the building. Enhancing the systems’ durability, Linetec finished all of the aluminum framing and sun shades in clear anodize.

“This is truly a standout building,” says Tubelite’s local client development manager. “The entrances, curtainwall and sun shades magnify the scale and sweep of the design viewed from the exterior. Grand views and lots of daylight bring a warmth and sense of place to the interior.”

**

Mansfield Independent School District, Center for the Performing Arts, 1110 W Debbie Lane, Mansfield, TX 76063; http://center.mansfieldisd.org
* Architect: Huckabee; Fort Worth, Texas; http://www.huckabee-inc.com
* General contractor: Byrne Construction Services; Fort Worth, Texas; http://www.tsbyrne.com
* Glazing contractor: Texas Commercial Glass Concepts, L.P.; Weatherford, Texas; http://www.texascommercialglass.com
* Glazing systems – finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.linetec.com
* Glazing systems – manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
* Photos courtesy of: Huckabee

###

Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

...[View full article]

Utah State University Wayne Estes Center Features Tubelite Curtainwall

Tubelite_UT_USUtrainingCtr6_TysonBybee_webIn his 20-plus years of coaching, Stew Morrill never had an office with a window. Now, Utah State University’s (USU’s) head basketball coach enjoys a gorgeous view of Cache Valley and the Wellsville Mountains framed by Tubelite’s curtainwall systems. Morill’s office is part of the University’s recently completed 32,744 square-foot Wayne Estes Training Center, which houses the campus’ basketball practice facility and 1,400-seat volleyball court. The center seeks LEED® Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, a standard that all new USU projects within the last seven years has earned.

Morrill tours USU recruits through the Center with pride and happily hosts them in his office — something he and his staff had never done before the new facility opened in May 2014. The expansive glass and metal façade that characterizes his office — and the $9.7 million facility as a whole — gives the building the aesthetic and practical appeal crucial for competing in the ultra-competitive recruiting environment of college athletics.

The impressive, daylight-filled lobby interior of the new facility, recognizes the Center’s namesake, Wayne Estes, as the greatest basketball player in USU’s history. He played for the Aggies from 1963 to 1965 and likely would have gone on to play in the NBA, but died in an electrical accident in 1965. He was posthumously given All-American honor  by the Associated Press, and was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1967. A large mural, memorabilia and a touchscreen educational kiosk share his life’s story in the building that serves as a tribute to his legacy. In addition to the memorial lobby and the office space, the facility contains a training room, strength-and-conditioning area, two regulation-size basketball courts and a regulation-size volleyball competition court.

Before the Center came online, USU was utilizing a nearby high school court for some of its basketball and volleyball practices, because there was not enough court space available on campus. These scheduling challenges were in turn causing interruptions to student-athletes’ class schedules. “Wayne Estes Center provides an outstanding opportunity to recruit student-athletes because of the services it provides, and the wow factor it has,” said Scott Barnes, USU vice president and director of athletics.”

Tubelite_UT_USUtrainingCtr9_TysonBybee_webDesigned by VCBO Architecture, USU’s new Wayne Estes Training Center was built by Okland Construction on a 10-month timeline. Beginning in September 2013, glazing contractor Steel Encounters Inc. installed the Center’s signature exterior curtainwall using Tubelite’s 400 Series system. Using Tubelite’s standard sun shade clips, Ducworks Inc. added a stainless steel, laser-cut, bull-shaped “Aggie” logo to accent the building.

The room above the court is called “the closing room,” because it presents such an enticing view for recruits visiting the facility. “The curtainwall system that contains the ‘closing room’ had to be as unobstructed as possible to enhance game views from this location,” notes VCBO’s principal, Derek Payne, AIA, LEED AP. “Potential recruits, potential donors and important visitors will all enjoy games from this location. The look of the cantilevering glass cube from the court below is also important. The sleek, mullionless look of this projection into the playing venue adds a bit of surprise and elegance to the game environment.”

Along with its attractive design, USU’s Wayne Estes Training Center was built to meet performance standards set by Utah’s Division of Facilities Construction & Management’s State Building Energy Efficiency Program (DFCM’s SBEEP). This program works to increase energy efficiency in both new and existing state buildings, and includes design and building to LEED Silver requirements. Since 2006, SBEEP reports more than $11 million in energy cost savings. Exemplifying this, Utah’s DFCM introduced an innovative approach to building envelope design on all new buildings that allow the mechanical systems to be downsized, along with significant reduction in ongoing utility costs and associated emissions.

Emphasizing the long-term savings, DFCM’s energy development director John Burningham wrote in the division’s recent newsletter (Second Quarter 2014): “Over the years DFCM has learned the immense value of having high performing building envelopes. Quality systems that perform as designed provide value to the building and its occupants for decades. Unlike mechanical systems that generally have an expected life of 10 to 20 years, the components of the building envelope generally last the entire life of the building. DFCM has one, if not the, most rigorous envelope programs in the nation to ensure the skin of the building is designed and installed with long term performance in mind.”

Tubelite_UT_USUtrainingCtr7_TysonBybee_webTo support the Center’s energy-efficiency and LEED Silver certification goals, Tubelite’s curtainwall was specified with a fiberglass pressure plate and PPG’s Solarban® low-e glass, achieving a maximum solar heat gain coefficient of (SHGC) 0.34 and U-Factor of 0.39 BTU/hr.sqft.ºF. With the fiberglass pressure plate, the framing system also delivers a high condensation resistance factor (CRF) of 76.

Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall with fiberglass pressure plate has a 2.5-inch sightline and the strength of variable-depth back-members from 4 to 7 inches. Minimizing the need for on-site cutting and fabricating, screw holes and weeps are machined at the factory into the off-white, pultruded fiberglass material.

The curtainwall system’s metal back-members and snap-on covers can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition. This also may contribute to obtaining additional credits as outlined by LEED. Enhancing the project’s environmental attributes, longevity and metallic appearance, the aluminum components were finished by Linetec using Class II clear anodize, which contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Anodize process by-products are recyclable and anodized aluminum is 100 percent recyclable. Because anodize is an integral part of the substrate, the coating delivers excellent wear and abrasion resistance with minimal maintenance.

“Student-athletes have been absolutely blown away by how nice this facility is,” stated USU’s Barnes. “What sets the Wayne Estes Center apart is its functionality as both a first-class basketball practice and elite volleyball competition venue. Our men and women’s basketball and volleyball coaches have some of the best office views in the entire valley and the finishes are spectacular.”

**

Wayne Estes Training Center, Utah State University Athletics, 800 E. and 900 N., Logan, Utah 84321; http://www.utahstateaggies.com
Owner: Utah State University; Logan, Utah; http://www.usu.edu
Project manager: State of Utah, Division of Facilities Construction & Management; Salt Lake City; http://dfcm.utah.gov
Architect: VCBO Architecture; Salt Lake City; http://www.vcbo.com
General contractor: Okland Construction; http://www.okland.com
Glazing contractor: Steel Encounters Inc.; Salt Lake City; http://steelencounters.com
Specialty signage – fabricator and installer: Ducworks, Inc.; Logan, Utah
Glazing systems – manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
Glazing systems – glass assemblies: PPG Industries; Solarban® 70; http://www.ppg.com
Glazing systems – finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.linetec.com
Photographers: Larry Ford, Steel Encounters Inc.; and Tyson Bybee, Bybee Photography LLC

###

Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

...[View full article]

Idaho’s Tallest Building Showcases Tubelite Products

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-1_MarcWalters_webRising above Boise’s skyline to become the tallest in Idaho, Eighth and Main prominently features Tubelite Inc.’s 400 Series curtainwall and entrances plus Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ INvision™ Series unitized curtainwall and ClearStory™ sun shades. The $76 million, 18-story mixed-use building opened Feb. 15, 2014, and is pursing Silver certification through the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® rating system.

The project’s architect of record, CTA Architects Engineers, not only designed the superstructure, but also occupies the 8th floor. On the 9th floor are Babcock Design Group’s offices, the architectural firm that served as the design architect for the overall project and the building envelope.

Built on a vacant lot known as the “Boise Hole,” the project erased an infamous eyesore from the city’s downtown. Constructing more than 390,000 square feet of Class A office, retail and restaurant space, it has brought new tenants and business to Boise’s downtown.

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-4_MarcWalters_webBuilding owner The Gardner Company, a full service real estate company, prides itself on partnering with companies that implement the highest of standards. This includes designing and constructing to LEED criteria, minimizing impact on the environment. To realize The Gardner Company’s vision, CTA collaborated with Babcock Design Group, general contractor Engineered Structures Inc. (ESI), plus other key building team members to create a cost-effective, durable and energy-efficient building.

ESI broke ground on the project in July 2012. By Spring 2013, Tubelite’s curtainwall and entrances started arriving at Eighth and Main’s job site. D&A Glass Company, Inc. installed Tubelite’s systems on the first two floors. Above these, D&A installed 72,000 square feet of Wausau’s unitized curtainwall, custom canopies and other finishing details.

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-5_MarcWalters_webSupporting the project’s energy-efficient and environmental attributes, Viracon’s high-performance insulating, laminated glass was used throughout the curtainwall, storefront and entrance systems. In addition to the curtainwall and sun shades, Wausau provided zero sightline vents, custom interior stools, and other aluminum-framed architectural building products.

Both Wausau’s and Tubelite’s aluminum extrusions from secondary billet contain at least 70% total recycled content. Linetec painted all of the aluminum framing in a 70% PVDF finish. This high-performance architectural coating meets the most stringent, exterior, architectural specification, American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s AAMA-2605. As an environmentally responsible finisher, Linetec safely captures and destroys the liquid paint’s volatile organic compounds (VOC) content before the finished material arrives at the job site.

At Eighth and Main’s grand opening ceremony on Feb. 15, 2014, Boise’s mayor David H. Bieter praised the building as the “crown jewel” of the city’s downtown. Current tenants include: Zions Bank, Holland & Hart, Parsons Behle & Latimer, A10 Capitol, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, Flatbread Pizza Company, On the Fly Deli and Zenergy Health Club.

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-2_MarcWalters_webAnchor tenant Zions Bank hosted a free community grand opening that included family activities, local food trucks and a rock concert. Scott Anderson, president and CEO of Zions Bank, noted, “We believe that this epic celebration is fitting as we close the books on ‘the Hole’ and pay tribute to the beautiful new building that’s taken its place as the tallest in Idaho.”

**

Eighth and Main, 800 W. Main St., Boise, Idaho  83702
* Owner: Gardner Company; Boise, Idaho; http://www.gardnercompany.net
* Architect of Record: CTA Architects Engineers; Boise, Idaho; http://ctagroup.com
* Design Architect – building envelope: Babcock Design Group; Boise, Idaho, and Salt Lake City; http://www.babcockdesign.com
* General Contractor: Engineered Structures Inc. (ESI); Meridian, Idaho; http://www.esiconstruction.com
* Glazing contractor: D&A Glass Company, Inc.; Boise, Idaho; http://www.daglass.net
* Glazing systems – curtainwall manufacturer: Wausau Window and Wall Systems, INvision Series curtainwall and ClearStory sun shades; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.wausauwindow.com
* Glazing systems – entrances manufacturer: Tubelite Inc., entrance systems and 400 Series curtainwall; Walker, Michigan; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
* Glazing systems – glass: Viracon; Owatonna, Minnesota; http://www.viracon.com
* Glazing systems – finisher: Linetec, Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.linetec.com
* Photographer: Marc Walters Photography
* Video: TreJuice Films, Trevor Atkinson, http://vimeo.com/77342437

###

Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

...[View full article]

Oklahoma’s High School Features Tubelite’s Systems

Tubelite is exhibiting at AIA Expo in booth #4634

Before Oklahoma’s Broken Arrow Public Schools renovated and expanded South Intermediate High School, nearly 200 classrooms throughout the district were in portable buildings. Students and educators were in dire need of permanent space. Upgrading the facility, the $9.4 million project renovated 9,800 square feet and added approximately 33,700 square feet of space. South Intermediate School - Broken ArrowTubelite’s storefront, curtainwall and entrance systems help convey a sense of connectedness across the large campus, while offering outside views and natural daylight.

South Intermediate High School’s extensive makeover was designed by Perkins+Will. Oklahoma-based Selser Schaefer Architects assisted in reinventing the school’s single-story Modern architecture. Ideal for low-rise applications with contemporary aesthetics, Tubelite’s T14000 Series Storefront, 400 Series Curtainwall and seven, Wide Stile doors were used throughout the campus’ renovation and addition.

Architectural Glass and Metal, Inc. installed more than 390 linear feet of Tubelite’s products, under the guidance of CMS Willowbrook who served as general contractor. South Intermediate High School remained open throughout construction of the project, which started in September 2011 and continued through December 2012. Today, the high school actively serves 1,400 students in grades 9 to 12.

A simple planning strategy was used to integrate the school’s existing structures with the expansion. The design created a courtyard that can be used for impromptu outdoor theatrical plays, as a pre-function space for basketball games, as a space for art projects, or for large all-school assemblies. “The courtyard gives the school a new identity. Visual and layered connections between arts and athletics facilitate a blended approach to community and education,” said Perkins+Will’s principal and k-12 regional practice leader, Patrick Glenn, AIA, REFP, LEED® AP.

South Intermediate School; Charles Davis Smith, AIA, architectural photographer; DallasOriented to capture indirect northern daylight, the courtyard provides deep overhangs to block the western and southern sun, while allowing for eastern morning light in the new art room. The art room is part of a massive, 33,700-square-foot multi-faceted performing arts addition. This addition was substantially complete in December 2012. Along with the art room, it houses a centralized theater, media center, art gallery, band hall, orchestra room and a choir rehearsal hall.

Oklahoma limestone topped with a sleek metal panel eyebrow and canopy denotes the performing arts center’s entry. According to Glenn, Tubelite’s products were used extensively throughout the performing arts facility addition. He noted, “Layering a sequence of spaces – outdoor to indoor and protected to open – promotes a hierarchy of arrival and gathering. The design provides a transparent wrapper crafting an indoor/outdoor destination and concentration for arts and the community. The pre-function lobby provides openness and transparency to the courtyard, while becoming a beacon for evening community events.”

On the new academic wing, large amounts of clear glazing continue to promote transparency from indoor to outdoor space. The space includes six state-of-the-art science classrooms, computer labs, administration areas and a teacher planning area. Brick masonry, light-colored exterior plaster and dark bronze anodize on the storefront, curtainwall and entrance systems’ aluminum framing complement the existing architecture.

Supporting educational facilities’ sustainability goals, the aluminum used to produce these systems’ framing can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content composition. Building upon these environmental attributes, Linetec’s eco-friendly anodize process sends 90 percent less waste to landfills than traditional anodizing. These durable architectural-grade finishes help minimize maintenance and meet the rigorous performance expectations of high school.

The project’s enduring and outstanding design earned a 2013 Built: Design Award from the American Institute of Architects’ Dallas, the chapter’s highest recognition of excellence.

“This project was a joint effort between the architects who brought their design skills to the table for conversations with the teachers and other end users of the facility,” said Michelle Bergwall, chief operating officer for operational services for Broken Arrow Public Schools. “The result is a building that is both beautiful and practical for daily operations.”

**

South Intermediate High School, 301 W. New Orleans St., Broken Arrow, OK 74012
* Owner: Broken Arrow Public Schools; Broken Arrow, Oklahoma; http://www.baschools.org
* Architect: Perkins+Will; Dallas; http://www.perkinswill.com/
* Assisting Architect: Selser Schaefer Architects; Tulsa, Oklahoma; http://www.selserschaefer.com/
* General Contractor: CMS Willowbrook; Oklahoma City; http://www.cmswillowbrook.com/
* Glazing Contractor: Architectural Glass & Metal, Inc.; Alma, Arkansas; http://archglassmetal.com/
* Entrance Systems – Manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://tubeliteinc.com
* Entrance Systems – Finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://linetec.com/
* Photography: Charles Davis Smith, AIA, architectural photographer; Dallas

###

Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

 

...[View full article]