Oklahoma’s High School Features Tubelite’s Systems

Tubelite is exhibiting at AIA Expo in booth #4634

Before Oklahoma’s Broken Arrow Public Schools renovated and expanded South Intermediate High School, nearly 200 classrooms throughout the district were in portable buildings. Students and educators were in dire need of permanent space. Upgrading the facility, the $9.4 million project renovated 9,800 square feet and added approximately 33,700 square feet of space. South Intermediate School - Broken ArrowTubelite’s storefront, curtainwall and entrance systems help convey a sense of connectedness across the large campus, while offering outside views and natural daylight.

South Intermediate High School’s extensive makeover was designed by Perkins+Will. Oklahoma-based Selser Schaefer Architects assisted in reinventing the school’s single-story Modern architecture. Ideal for low-rise applications with contemporary aesthetics, Tubelite’s T14000 Series Storefront, 400 Series Curtainwall and seven, Wide Stile doors were used throughout the campus’ renovation and addition.

Architectural Glass and Metal, Inc. installed more than 390 linear feet of Tubelite’s products, under the guidance of CMS Willowbrook who served as general contractor. South Intermediate High School remained open throughout construction of the project, which started in September 2011 and continued through December 2012. Today, the high school actively serves 1,400 students in grades 9 to 12.

A simple planning strategy was used to integrate the school’s existing structures with the expansion. The design created a courtyard that can be used for impromptu outdoor theatrical plays, as a pre-function space for basketball games, as a space for art projects, or for large all-school assemblies. “The courtyard gives the school a new identity. Visual and layered connections between arts and athletics facilitate a blended approach to community and education,” said Perkins+Will’s principal and k-12 regional practice leader, Patrick Glenn, AIA, REFP, LEED® AP.

South Intermediate School; Charles Davis Smith, AIA, architectural photographer; DallasOriented to capture indirect northern daylight, the courtyard provides deep overhangs to block the western and southern sun, while allowing for eastern morning light in the new art room. The art room is part of a massive, 33,700-square-foot multi-faceted performing arts addition. This addition was substantially complete in December 2012. Along with the art room, it houses a centralized theater, media center, art gallery, band hall, orchestra room and a choir rehearsal hall.

Oklahoma limestone topped with a sleek metal panel eyebrow and canopy denotes the performing arts center’s entry. According to Glenn, Tubelite’s products were used extensively throughout the performing arts facility addition. He noted, “Layering a sequence of spaces – outdoor to indoor and protected to open – promotes a hierarchy of arrival and gathering. The design provides a transparent wrapper crafting an indoor/outdoor destination and concentration for arts and the community. The pre-function lobby provides openness and transparency to the courtyard, while becoming a beacon for evening community events.”

On the new academic wing, large amounts of clear glazing continue to promote transparency from indoor to outdoor space. The space includes six state-of-the-art science classrooms, computer labs, administration areas and a teacher planning area. Brick masonry, light-colored exterior plaster and dark bronze anodize on the storefront, curtainwall and entrance systems’ aluminum framing complement the existing architecture.

Supporting educational facilities’ sustainability goals, the aluminum used to produce these systems’ framing can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content composition. Building upon these environmental attributes, Linetec’s eco-friendly anodize process sends 90 percent less waste to landfills than traditional anodizing. These durable architectural-grade finishes help minimize maintenance and meet the rigorous performance expectations of high school.

The project’s enduring and outstanding design earned a 2013 Built: Design Award from the American Institute of Architects’ Dallas, the chapter’s highest recognition of excellence.

“This project was a joint effort between the architects who brought their design skills to the table for conversations with the teachers and other end users of the facility,” said Michelle Bergwall, chief operating officer for operational services for Broken Arrow Public Schools. “The result is a building that is both beautiful and practical for daily operations.”

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South Intermediate High School, 301 W. New Orleans St., Broken Arrow, OK 74012
* Owner: Broken Arrow Public Schools; Broken Arrow, Oklahoma; http://www.baschools.org
* Architect: Perkins+Will; Dallas; http://www.perkinswill.com/
* Assisting Architect: Selser Schaefer Architects; Tulsa, Oklahoma; http://www.selserschaefer.com/
* General Contractor: CMS Willowbrook; Oklahoma City; http://www.cmswillowbrook.com/
* Glazing Contractor: Architectural Glass & Metal, Inc.; Alma, Arkansas; http://archglassmetal.com/
* Entrance Systems – Manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://tubeliteinc.com
* Entrance Systems – Finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://linetec.com/
* Photography: Charles Davis Smith, AIA, architectural photographer; Dallas

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

 

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Music City Center welcomes CSI convention attendees through Tubelite’s doors

TL MCC DoubleTubelite is exhibiting at CSI 2013 Booth #343

Opened in May 2013, the new $585 million Music City Center (MCC) in Nashville hosts the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) annual convention and CONSTRUCT Show. Unlike most convention centers’ “box with docks” design, MCC showcases a glass and limestone exterior highlighting natural light, outside views and open corridors with more than 1,000 doors. Helping achieve this transparency and connection to surrounding spaces, Tubelite Inc. provided storefront and entrance systems that were installed by Nashville-based Alexander Metals, Inc.

Spanning 1.2 million square feet, MCC has been called a “wide-scraper” as it stretches 19 acres and six city blocks. It offers 353,143-square-foot exhibit space with multiple flex space, 90,000 square feet of meeting rooms/break-out space, a guitar-shaped 57,000-square-foot ballroom with built-in stage, and an 18,000-square-foot junior ballroom.

Musical motifs permeate the facility. Nashville’s music and entertainment industry has a $10 billion annual economic impact on the region. Recognizing the economic and cultural importance, the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and more than 100 custom art installation also are displayed inside the MCC.

CSI CONSTRUCT attendees are among the many who will experience the facility’s amenities. The Nashville Convention & Visitors Bureau has booked 123 trade shows or conventions at the new center and more than 1 million hotel room nights, a list that extends to 2026. Hotels and other commercial real estate in the surrounding area have responded with new construction and renovation projects to attract arriving visitors.

Inspiring the building boom, MCC’s design team includes tvsdesign of Atlanta with Tuck-Hinton Architects and Moody-Nolan, Inc., both of Nashville. “There is a lot of love, care, heart and soul that have gone into this project from all three firms, the construction team and the mayor,” said one of the project’s principal architects at tvsdesign, C. Andrew McLean, FAIA. “We all wanted to create a landmark that would not only make Nashville proud, but also reflect the unique culture of the area.”

In keeping with the city’s commitment to sustainable development, the MCC is committed to LEED® Silver certification through the U.S. Green Building Council. Contributing to the project’s green goals, the aluminum used to produce Tubelite’s 8-foot-tall monumental doors and storefront systems was extruded using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

TL MCC SingleSupporting the MCC’s indoor air quality control plan requiring the use of low-emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs), Tubelite’s aluminum framing was finished by Linetec using clear anodize, which uses no VOCs. Because it is an integral part of the substrate, the anodic coating results in a hard, durable substance providing excellent wear and abrasion resistance with minimal maintenance. Anodize process by-products are recyclable and anodized aluminum is 100% recyclable.

“We wanted to not only make this a landmark structure for Nashville, but we also wanted to show a deep respect for the Tennessee environment,” said tvsdesign’s Kevin Gordon, AIA, LEED AP, another of the project’s principal architects.

From top to bottom, MCC focuses on environmental considerations. The facility is capped with 175,000-square-foot vegetative roof with 845 photovoltaic panels. A key design element, the roof is described as undulating “to represent the rolling hills of Tennessee and the sound waves that can be overheard by musicians playing in clubs on Broadway, at the Grand Ole Opry or Schermerhorn Center.”

Located in the heart of downtown Nashville, the convention center took 3.5 years to construct due in part to its scale and complex geometry, and also to a devastating flood that hit the city in May 2010. (A time-lapse video of the construction can be viewed at http://www.tennessean.com/section/projects07.) More than 7,300 people worked on the project’s construction and completed the project one week ahead of schedule in April 2013.

Leading the effort, general contractor Bell/Clark’s joint venture team is comprised of Bell & Associates Construction, LP, of Brentwood, Tenn., and Clark Construction Group, LLC, in association with Harmony Construction Group, LLC, of Nashville. Additional Nashville-based project partners include Ross Bryan & Associates and Logan Patri Engineering, structural engineers; I.C. Thomasson Associates Inc., and ECS mechanical engineers; and Barge Waggoner Sumner and Cannon, Inc., civil engineers.

“The entire project and construction management team and all the subcontractors and suppliers have proven their commitment to the project and the city of Nashville throughout the last three years, giving us regular updates that validated our confidence in them,” said Convention Center Authority chair, Marty Dickens. “They have done an outstanding job.”

“I applaud the project management team and its crew for finishing construction of the Music City Center ahead of their deadline,” Mayor Karl Dean also stated. “It is no small feat to finish construction on time, but to do so for a project of this scale is truly remarkable.

In May, MCC’s grand opening celebrations took place with a concert headlined by Sheryl Crow. In June, the project was honored with an Excellence in Building Green at the Governor’s Environmental Stewardship awards from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. In July, it was named the winner of the Greater Nashville Hospitality Association’s Associate Award of Excellence. In August, the facility’s architectural team proudly joined their colleagues at the AIA Tennessee Convention and Exhibition held at MCC.

“I continue to be impressed by the size and beauty of the Music City Center,” Dean said. “There’s no doubt we are a city with momentum, and with the opening of the Music City Center… even more tourists and conventioneers will get to see that first hand. We know it’s not going to be the biggest convention facility in the country, but I’m absolutely certain it will be the best.”

TL MCC WallCrop

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Music City Center; G, 150 4th Ave N #250G, Nashville, TN 37219; http://www.nashvillemusiccitycenter.com/
* Owner: Convention Center Authority, Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County; Nashville, Tenn.; http://www.nashvilleconventionctr.com
* Architect: tvsdesign; Atlanta; http://www.tvsa.com
with Tuck-Hinton Architects; Nashville, Tenn.
and Moody-Nolan, Inc.; Nashville, Tenn.
* General contractor: Bell/Clark joint venture team of
Bell & Associates Construction, LP; Brentwood, Tenn.;
Clark Construction Group, LLC; http://www.clarkconstruction.com/
in association with Harmony Construction Group, LLC; Nashville, Tenn.;
* Glazing contractor: Alexander Metals, Inc.; Nashville, Tenn.; http://www.alexandermetalsinc.com
* Entrance systems – manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Mich.; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
* Entrance systems – glass fabricator: Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope; Santa Monica, Calif.; http://www.oldcastlebe.com/
* Entrance systems – finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wis.; http://www.linetec.com
* Construction Specifications Institute: http://www.csinet.org/
* CONSTRUCT Show: http://www.constructshow.com/

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

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Pompeys Pillar National Monument Features 400 Series Curtainwall

Designed for low- and mid-rise applications, the durable framework of Tubelite Inc.’s 400 Series curtainwall can be seen on such notable projects as Pompeys Pillar National Monument.

Located 25 miles east of Billings, Montana, Pompeys Pillar is the site of the only remaining physical evidence on the trail of the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803-1806. It was designated as a National Monument in 2001 to commemorate and emphasize Captain William Clark’s journey along the Yellowstone River from Bozeman to the confluence of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers.

Captain Clark carved his name into the face of the 150-foot butte on July 25, 1806 during his return to the United States through the Yellowstone Valley. He named the Pillar “Pompeys Tower” in honor of Sacagawea’s son, Jean Baptiste Charbonneau, whom he had nicknamed “Pomp.”

The Apsáalooke Tribe, also known as the Crow Nation, continues to use the Pillar for vision quests and as a prayer site. The Apsáalooke people called the Pillar “the place where the Mountain Lion lives,” because the north face’s natural sandstone formation resembles a mountain lion’s head.

The Pompeys Pillar National Monument is open April 30-October 15. The information center was designed by Denver-based Anderson Mason Dale Architects. CCM Inc. of Hardin, Mont., was the general contractor. Glazing contractor Associated Glass of Billings, Mont., installed Tubelite’s system in 2005.

Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall provides industry-leading structural performance reducing the need for steel reinforcing. This system has a 2.5-inch sightline and the strength of back members varying in depth from 4 to 8 inches. An exterior screw-applied pressure bar secures the glass. Snap-on covers, available in a wide range of colors, allow for different finishes on interior and exterior exposed surfaces. Silicone glazed verticals are available for a seamless appearance.

The aluminum used to produce this curtainwall can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes. For Pompeys Tower, a Dark Bronze anodize was used to complement the natural woodwork and natural landscape.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

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Bernalillo Elementary School Achieves Sustainable Tubelite’s Products

The first new elementary school in New Mexico’s Bernalillo Public Schools district in 30 years features storefront, curtainwall and sun shades from Tubelite, Inc.

Bernalillo Elementary School’s Albuquerque-based team included Fanning Bard Tatum (FBT) Architects AIA, Ltd.; Enterprise Builders Corporation; and Southwest Glass & Glazing, Inc. This new elementary school facility was developed as part of a reorganization plan of two existing school campuses. To create a unified campus, the new 64,500-square-foot educational facility was constructed on a compact site next to the existing middle school. This positioning allows for greater operational efficiency through the shared use of parking, bus zones, game fields and playgrounds.

FBT Architects designed the new, two-story, $10 million elementary as a “High Performance School” with the building materials and system selection promoting a healthy, sustainable environment. “Natural daylighting was very important to the design of the school,” says FBT’s project manager, Jeremy Trumble, LEED® Accredited Professional. “Students and teachers were being relocated from an existing facility that had very small windows making the learning environment dark and stuffy, as well as limiting visual access for safety and security.”

The new elementary school’s teaching classrooms are arranged in three separate wings, corresponding to the three grade levels at the school. The library occupies an important corner at the middle of the second level, providing a central access point for each grade level wing and offering unrestricted views of the adjacent Rio Grande valley and surrounding vistas.

Providing students with natural views and light began with school’s orientation. “The majority of the classrooms faced north or south to help control the direct/indirect sun into each room,” continues Trumble. “Exterior sun shades were added to increase the controllability of the natural light.”

Max/Block™ sun shades by Tubelite® maximize daylighting and minimize solar heat gain. These benefits, coupled with recycled content and outside views, are key criteria for projects pursuing certification through the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Rating Systems.

“Sun shades help significantly lower buildings’ cooling costs and energy use, while still letting natural light fill the workspace,” says Mary Olivier, Tubelite’s marketing manager. “Max/Block sun shades are easy-to-install, aesthetically-and structurally-compatible with Tubelite’s curtainwall and storefront systems.”

Trumble also notes that the Bernalillo Elementary School’s large expanses of glazing “not only enhance safety and security, but reinforce the transparency of the building.”

Optimizing strength and thermal performance on Bernalillo Elementary School, Tubelite’s T14000 Series storefront and 400 Series curtainwall accommodate a wide range of glass options and infills. The curtainwall relies on an exterior screw-applied pressure bar to secure the glass. The storefront system offers the flexibility of glazing the storefront system from either inside or outside helps reduce installation time and associated labor costs.

Linetec finished the storefront and curtainwall systems’ aluminum framing members for Bernalillo Elementary School applying paint on the interior and clear anodize on the exterior. This eco-friendly anodize process sends 90% less waste to landfills than traditional anodizing. Painted finishes also are applied and controlled in an environmentally effective manner to minimize, or even eliminate, volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These architectural-grade finishes help minimize maintenance and further protect the entrance systems’ rigorous operation.

Bernalillo Elementary School serves approximately 450 third- through fifth-grade students and faculty. Previously, these students attended Carroll Elementary, which was built in 1980 as the district’s last “new” elementary. The kindergarten through second-grade students attended Roosevelt Elementary. When the new elementary opened in August 2010, Carroll became the kindergarten through second-grade campus and Roosevelt transitioned to administrative offices.

Today, faculty and students at Bernalillo Elementary School access 21 teaching classrooms along with several special education spaces; areas for music, art and computer labs; plus a cafeteria and kitchen, administrative offices and a multi-purpose room.

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Bernalillo Elementary School, 480 Calle del Norte, Bernalillo, N.M.
* Owner: Bernalillo Public Schools; Albuquerque, N.M.
* Architect: Fanning Bard Tatum Architects AIA, Ltd.; Albuquerque, N.M.
* General contractor: Enterprise Builders Corporation; Albuquerque, N.M.
* Glazing contractor: Southwest Glass & Glazing, Inc.; Albuquerque, N.M.
* Entrance systems –  manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Mich.
* Entrance systems –  finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wis.
* Photographer: mattophoto architectural photography; Albuquerque, N.M.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

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Tubelite’s Products Add to High-Tech Look and Feel

Walker, Mich. — Berrien Springs School District’s Virtual Learning Academy is taking public education to the next level. The recently opened facility, which offers area students both traditional “on-site” education and online courses, features the latest advances in technology, design and materials, including storefront systems manufactured by Tubelite.

The building’s striking exterior, designed by local architects CARMI Design Group, is the first indication that this school is different from other schools in Southwestern Michigan. “We wanted the building’s form to portray the modern style of learning that occurs within its walls,” said Tony Leininger, president of CARMI Design Group. “Tubelite’s range of products and industry expertise gave us the freedom to execute our design concept in a way that other products could not.”

The resulting design features three distinct spaces, sharp angles and generous uses of glass framed in recycled aluminum by Tubelite’s 14000 and T14650 Series Storefronts. Linetec painted the aluminum in Hartford Green fluoropolymer finish, corresponding with the school’s “Home of the Shamrocks” motto.

Designed for low-rise applications, Tubelite’s 14000 Series Storefront durable, flush-glazed system offers optimal strength and thermal performance. Framing members have 2×4.5-inch profiles. Tubelite’s 14650 Series frame offers the same design, assembly and accessories as the 14000 Series’ 2-inch face, but features a depth of 6.5 inches. The additional 2-inch depth on the interior side of the frame provides greater structural properties and allows taller first floor openings.

Inside the 6,700-square-foot learning facility, the futuristic features continue. Visitors enter the building’s lobby, which houses an interactive cyber café, with vending area, café-style tables and chairs, and lounge seating. The structure’s two “pods” include a conference room with interactive whiteboards, high-resolution projectors, image-capturing equipment and other high-tech components, and a state-of-the-art computer lab. In addition to 60 computers, the lab has three large-format projection screens on different walls to support the concept that the “front” of the room is wherever the instructor is at that moment.

The Virtual Learning Academy’s edgy architecture has garnered positive reviews from district staff and the community, and helped the building become the face of the district. But according to Leininger, the most important feedback has come from the students themselves.

Berrien Springs Technology Director Brandon Waggoner has said that the building’s state-of-the-art feel helped the students learn more effectively by making them feel as if they had arrived someplace special.

The $1.8 million Virtual Learning Academy opened for high school students at the start of the fall semester, September 2010, and is now offers enrollment for middle school students.

 

Berrien Springs Virtual Academy; One Sylvester Avenue, Berrien Springs, Mich.
* Owner: Berrien Springs Public Schools
* Architect: CARMI Design Group. Inc.; Edwardsburg, Mich.
* General contractor: Shelton Construction; Benton Harbor, Mich.
* Glazing contractor: Midwest Glass & Mirror; Stevensville, Mich.
* Glass fabricator: PPG Industries; Pittsburgh
* Storefront systems: Tubelite Inc.; Grand Rapids, Mich.
* Storefront systems’ finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wis.
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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

High-resolution photos available for download: vertical and horizontal.
Include credit line: photo by Joseph Hilliard, courtesy of Tubelite Inc.

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