AIA New York, Procrastinators’ Days, Dec. 4-6

TL_UFactor_NFRCTubelite’s architectural specification manager Tom Minnon presents “Determining Fenestration U-Factors” (1 LU|HSW – T5: A4442E) at the AIA New York chapter’s Procrastinators’ Days on Thurs., Dec. 4, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

With nearly four decades of industry experience, Minnon is a LEED® Accredited Professional by the U.S. Green Building Council and a Certified FenestrationMaster™ by the American Architectural Manufacturers Association.

Helping architects earn up to 18 of their continuing education Learning Units, the chapter’s event is held Dec. 4-6 at the Center for Architecture. Learn more at http://aiany.aiany.org/index.php?section=procrastinators

...[View full article]

Shared Learnings: FenestrationMaster

by Tom Minnon, CFM, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

This month, I am proud to add Certified FenestrationMaster (CFM) to the list of certifications, accreditations and accomplishments I’ve gained during my 38 years of experience in this ever-changing industry. I am one of the first people to earn this certification through AAMA’s FenestrationMasters™ program.

FenestrationAssociate is offered for entry-level certification and is available to all. FenestrationMaster is the advanced level and requires the candidate to have either six years fenestration product-related experience, or a four-year degree in engineering, architecture or applied sciences plus four years of industry experience. Those who choose to enroll in the program receive a Candidate Guide, Study Notebook and three-month access to AAMA’s Study Resource Center with read-only access to AAMA documents referenced in the courses.

While I may have been qualified as a candidate for the advanced-level certification, I still needed to do my homework and successfully complete the 32 in-depth, online courses. These include:

Group 1
• Window Selection
• Glass Selection
• Requirements of NAFS-08 Standard (and variances from earlier editions)
• Specialty Tests (blast, impact, tornado, acoustics)

Group 2
• Profile Performance and Material Considerations
• Coatings and Finishes

Group 3
• Hardware, Weatherstrip and Weatherseals
• Sealants and Adhesives Used during Factory Fabrication

Group 4
• Code Requirements
• History of the I-Codes & Current Requirements
• AAMA Certification and I-Code Compliance
• Special Code Requirements: ADA, WOCD, fire safety, safety glazing
• Energy Efficiency and Thermal Performance
• ICC energy code requirements and Energy Star requirements
• Thermal Performance Certification versus Testing
• Skylights for Daylighting

Group 5
• Installation
• Commercial Installation Standard Practice
• Residential Installation
• Flashing
• Field Testing and Forensic Evaluation
• Fenestration Anchorage

Group 6
• Aluminum Curtain Wall Design
• Aluminum Storefronts and Entrances
• Energy and the Architectural Fenestration Industry

Since I have been involved in commercial fenestration most of my career, it was challenging to learn some of the courses that involved PVC and fiberglass windows, residential installation standards and anchorage.

Once I finished the coursework and spent several hours studying the material, I felt prepared and completed the exam. The final exam must be completed at an official testing center or using AAMA-authorized proctor. The test itself was straightforward and I felt confident about the results. If a candidate fails, they are encouraged to brush up on their studies and retake the test. They have up to three attempts in 12 months to pass the exam.

For me, scheduling the exam was probably the most difficult task. As my years of experience add up, so too do my professional responsibilities. I’m proud to be part of a company that continues to grow and thrive, especially in light of the economic climate. As the company expands its products, its locations and its knowledge, we continue to keep our customers as the top priority.

As I consider my commitments for the New Year, I must say good-bye for now. Thank you to Key Communications for the opportunity, to those who took the time to comment or email me, and to all of you who took the time to read. It’s been a pleasure to share this last year with you.

**

Tom Minnon, CFM, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

###

...[View full article]

Shared Learnings: It’s That Time of Year

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Summer sets as the autumn tradeshow season dawns. GlassBuild America, Sept. 10-12 in Atlanta, and CSI Construct, Sept. 25-27 in Nashville, bring that bittersweet reminder that we have entered the third quarter. This year’s expos are expected to showcase new fenestration products to meet commercial buildings’ increasingly stringent performance and code requirements.

Last October, Hurricane Sandy proved to be the second-costliest hurricane in U.S. history with damages estimated at $68 billion. The 2013 hurricane season already has produced four named storms. Entering into the peak of the season, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued an update in August predicting a 70% chance of seeing above-average activity in the Atlantic with potentially 13-19 named storms, six to nine hurricanes, and three to five of those hurricanes becoming major events.

Hurricane impact-resistant fenestration products help address commercial building owners’ concerns for mitigating damage to their property and protecting occupants from shattered glass and wind-borne debris. A breadth of storefront and entrance systems are available to comply with High-Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ) wind zones, as well as Miami-Dade and Florida Building Codes.

DOE_EnergyCodes_map_imgAs Model Energy Codes become a reality, more building owners will seek fenestration systems offering high thermal performance. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program maps current and projected commercial building energy code adoption activity. For example, in Georgia where GlassBuild is held, ASHRAE 90.1-2010/2012 IECC or equivalent is projected for adoption by the end of 2015. In California, this already has been adopted.

Energy efficiency, recycled content and daylighting remain key criteria in LEED® v.4, recently approved by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). In Tennessee where Construct is held, the USGBC reports that four “municipal governments have made policy commitments that advance better building practices by rewarding leadership with LEED… Tennessee state ranks 22nd in the nation with 529 commercial buildings that are LEED registered and certified, totaling more than 63 million square feet.”

This November, Pennsylvania will host USGBC members and allied professionals in Philadelphia for the annual Greenbuild International Conference and Expo. The state ranks fifth in the nation with 1,816 commercial buildings that are LEED registered and certified. Detailed market reports are available for download online at USGBC.org under the Resources page.

USGBC enjoys membership crossover with the American Institute of Architects (AIA). While AIA champions green building goals, it no longer requires its members to specifically earn continuing education credits for sustainable design. Although there are differences by state, AIA members now are required to complete 12 hours of health, safety and welfare (HSW) education, where eight hours previously were needed.

Thousands of AIA members earn these credits at their local chapters’ annual conferences and conventions, many of which are held during the autumn. A list of AIA’s 300 component organizations, contacts and events can be found at AIA.org under the AIA Chapters page. For example, AIA Illinois annual conference is scheduled for Nov 7-9.

Also is hosted in Illinois, Glass Expo Midwest takes place Oct. 31-Nov. 1 at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel. Now in its 18th year, the event is conveniently co-located to welcome Fenestration Day attendees.

Whichever tradeshows and conferences you attend this autumn, remember to do more than just attend – participate! If you’re in a seminar, ask the speaker a question. If you’re in the expo hall, make time to see the newest products. If you’re at lunch, strike up a conversation with a colleague. These events are among the few industry forums for face-to-face interaction. Be sure to take advantage of them.

**

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

###

...[View full article]

Shared Learnings: The NFRC Non-Residential Program

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

For the past 20 years, the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) has provided a fair, accurate, and credible rating and labeling system for windows, doors, and skylights used in residential construction. Anyone who has shopped for a residential window has seen a label similar to the one below:

ES_NFRC_LabelRatings on the NFRC label have been achieved through standardized test methods at independently operated laboratories. This standardized method allows you to fairly compare window performance of “Manufacturer A” to “Manufacturer B.”

The NFRC testing protocols involve testing of the full window — including glass, frame, spacers, and any other component that is a permanent part of the complete product. This strategy provides a more accurate reflection of how the product will perform in the home than testing of just glass, as the framing and other components influence ratings such as U-Factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) and Visible Transmittance (VT).

In commercial storefront and curtainwall glazing systems, glazing contractors combine various components that have not been tested as a complete product. For instance, storefront or curtainwall from one manufacturer; glass, coatings and infill from another; and the insulting glass spacer from yet another.

NFRC’s Component Modeling Approach (CMA) Product Certification Program enables whole product energy performance ratings for non-residential projects. CMA uses a simulation tool called CMA Software Tool (CMAST), which includes a database of online performance data for the three primary components of a fenestration product — glazing, frame, and glass spacer — to generate overall product performance ratings for U-Factor, SHGC and VT. The database is essentially a library that houses data on a wide variety of fenestration components. Microsoft PowerPoint - EduCode Presentation R2 [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

While the CMA program has been around for a number of years, it is just now beginning to be widely used and accepted. CMA’s non-residential energy performance data is used in determining code compliance and for meaningful whole building energy analysis. The certification and rating program is credible, simple, cost effective, fair, uniform and useful.

Though the current non-residential program offered by the NFRC Site-Built program provides consistent and reliable energy performance ratings, the CMA program allows for different segments of the fenestration industry to obtain standardized energy performance ratings for fenestration components and component systems including glass, spacers, and frames.

Once tested by an accredited lab, modeled by an Approved Calculation Entity, validated by an approved Inspection Agency, and entered into the CMAST database, these systems reside in electronic libraries that can be easily accessed by those who wish to determine and/or obtain NFRC energy performance ratings (U-Factor, SHGC, VT) for entire window, entrance, storefront, and curtainwall systems.

The libraries are especially useful to architects and builders for:

  • Designing envelope/fenestration systems for maximum energy efficiency — whether solar control, energy efficiency, daylighting, or passive solar design
  • Comparing the energy performance of different fenestration components and products, and making more informed choices
  • Enforcing – related specified performance to installed performance

In the example below, the total performance characteristics of the total system are as follows —

  • U-Factor: 0.34
  • SHGC: 0.20
  • VT: 0.43
  • LSG: 0.43/0.20 = 2.15 (visible light to solar heat gain)

TL_300ES_NFRC-CMAST

These values are based on the following components:

  • Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall with 2.5 x 7.5-inch aluminum framing and thermal pressure plate
  • PPG’s Solarban® 70XL low-e glass with 90% argon fill
  • Technoform Glass Insulation’s warm edge spacer

CMA shows how changing one component affects overall energy efficiency and provides information on which components can be combined. Ultimately, the information obtained from CMA can be used to determine a whole product energy performance rating for a fenestration system.

 

Resources:
Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.commercialwindows.org/
ENERGY STAR, http://www.energystar.gov
National Fenestration Rating Council, http://www.nfrc.org/05Tubelite_LEED-AP_TomMinnon
Technoform Glass Insulation, http://www.glassinsulation.us/
Tubelite Inc., http://www.tubeliteinc.com

**

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

###

...[View full article]

Aluminum Finishing – PVDF Coatings (Part 2 of 2)

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Know the Code

When specifying a paint code for your project, always double check for accuracy. The specific code is what drives the ordering process and the achieved color. The color name is only a guideline; many times manufacturers and applicators will have the same paint name for different paint types and colors. Relying on a color name alone can be a risk. As an example, one manufacturer can have 50 paint codes all named “Hartford Green.”

Coated aluminum panels have been tested for performance in the high-salt, high-humidity, and high-UV exposure environment of South Florida. Image courtesy of Linetec.

Coated aluminum panels have been tested for performance in the high-salt, high-humidity, and high-UV exposure environment of South Florida. Image courtesy of Linetec.

Accuracy of the paint code is vital. Paint manufacturer and many applicators have their own coding system for assigning paint codes to colors. Each letter and number within the product formula has a specific meaning related to the color and tint, gloss, primer, topcoat, or the use of mica and metallics. Due to the immeasurable number of different paint codes, one incorrect number or letter within a code can completely change the paint formulation.

Architects’ specifications for fluoropolymer finishes often read as: “PVDF-Based Coating: AAMA 2605, fluoropolymer finish containing minimum 70 percent PVDF resins, color to be selected from manufacturer’s full color range.”

This generic specification makes it very difficult for the aluminum manufacturer and glazing contractor to determine what price level they should include in their quote. Most aluminum manufacturers have a list of stock paint colors that have a lower price point than other colors. Does “manufacturer’s full color range” include all possible colors available from the paint manufacturer? Will it be a two-coat or XL three-coat finish? Whenever possible, the architect should clearly state what color will be required on the project.

AAMA Specifications

AAMA 2603 is typically an interior specification. Baked enamel (acrylic/polyester) paints should meet AAMA 2603. The baked enamel coatings are harder than the fluoropolymer PVDF coatings and often are used for interior application where color retention is not required. These paints are less expensive, but have poor resistance to color fading and chalking.

AAMA 2604 is an “intermediate” specification. A paint meeting this specification would be a 50% fluoropolymer. An application for this paint would be storefront, doors or other high-traffic areas. This finish will provide good color and gloss retention. It also will provide good hardness and abrasion resistance.

AAMA 2605 is the high-performance exterior specification. A paint meeting this specification would be a 70% fluoropolymer. These finishes exhibit outstanding resistance to humidity, color change, chalk, gloss loss and chemicals. An application for this finish would include monumental architectural projects.

Field Repair

Whether your building’s finish has faded and discolored, or your new building has been damaged during construction, it can be corrected on-site with a knowledgeable team and the proper product.

Storefronts and other high-traffic areas may need to be repainted periodically. As good as it is, painted aluminum is not completely maintenance-free, nor does it last forever. Painted aluminum can chip and scratch on high-wear areas such as sliding doors and entrance ways.

For more than 40 years, PVDF-based finishes have held the position as the world’s premiere exterior metal finish. PVDF-based Air Dry System (ADS) offers the same superior weathering properties as factory-appliced PVDF, and can be field-applied on almost any building material, restoring surfaces to last and look like new.

PVDF-based ADS coatings are designed for repairing, restoring and/or repainting the metal on buildings that have a factory-applied PVDF-based coating. These coatings only can be applied by licensed fluoropolymer applicators. PVDF-based ADS coatings are intended for use as a two-coat system. PVDF-based ADS provides very high resistance to fading, chalking, UV degradation and chemical corrosion. PVDF-based ADS restores structures to their original luster, while meeting weathering requirements of AAMA 2605, the most stringent specification for architectural coatings.

**

Resources:

* Arkema Kynar
* Linetec05Tubelite_LEED-AP_TomMinnon
* Tubelite Inc.
* Solvay Hylar

**

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

###

...[View full article]